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...a glimpse into life on Vancouver Island, needle felting, photography, food, gardening, etcetera...etcetera
"Happiness always looks small when you hold it in your hands, but let it go, and at once you learn how big and precious it is."
Maxim Gorky

Monday, March 15, 2010

'A' for effort....

I used to get  comments from teachers on my school report cards that would say things like..."If Kerry would only apply herself, she could go far" or "If Kerry would spend as much time on her schoolwork as she does socializing, she would do quite well".
Although I would always get top marks in visual art.
It was just that some things, like math, didn't mesh with the way I thought.
When I decided to take clarinet lessons in grade 7, I was so thrilled! Finally I will learn to do something I love!
I would lovingly open the case and shine up the silver buttons and oil the ebony wood...until 2 weeks into the music class, I realized that the teacher and I were not meant for each other. She did not seem to enjoy her job and was VERY impatient with us kids. At the end of the 2 month session, I quit and never took it up again.
Reading music, to me, is like math. I have never been able to get a hold on it and my meager guitar playing has come from playing by ear and reading those oh so easy guitar chord diagrams above the music.
Its the visuals for me that get me through.
Look at this beauty!
I bought her at a yard sale many many years ago with the honest intentions of learning to play her...
Those bellows are like a work of art!
After reading endofera's
post on accomplishing 'lists', I decided to really put the effort into one of the  things on my list of things I want to accomplish which is....
#3: Learn to play one song on the cello.
Yeah, funny looking cello hey?
But since I don't have a cello handy, I am substituting this lovely push button diatonic accordion.
I was listening to Kate Rusby singing a beautiful version of the old folk tune 'Wild Mountain Thyme' and thought this would be an 'easy' one to try...I am  in deep appreciation of those who have mastered the art of playing an instrument and thought if I could have one wish it would be to be able to play a musical instrument really well.
I may need to buy a book to help me along but I'm definitely giving myself an 'A' for effort.
I try to practice when Tom isn't home so as not to torture him with the same notes over and over...
My childhood teachers will be happy to know that I AM applying myself and keeping my socializing only to the dog and cat (who can't talk back anyway, are afraid of the noise coming out of this thing and usually hide in the bedroom).
If I can at least master just 1 song on this old girl, I will surely be inspired.

5 comments:

endofera said...

I find that if you stick your list of things to do on the fridge with a timetable of when and where....it will always be there to remind you....once it is written...there's no turning back....
Go n'eirí an bóthar leat...a chairde....

Karen said...

Oh! Congratulations. And all best.
You are enjoying the process.

endofera said...

Translation is "May the road rise up to meet you....my friend!!"
The little accent over the í is called a fada...this gives all vowels a longer kind of sound during pronounciation...i.e. an é would sound like a for ape.....and í would sound like ee in see....and ó would sound like o in go....and á would sound like aw in Shaw....and ú would sound like the oo in cool.....

Jacquie said...

I'm a teacher. A year ago I had to teach math, in Spanish no less. After decades of failing and hating, HATING math. I love it now. It makes sense now. I can teach it now. Because I use visuals to learn and to teach. So there you are. You probably have a lovely mind for numbers. But you have to see them and feel them in order to learn them.

I've always wanted to play an instrument. Your post reminded me how much. Mmmmmmh...

Jacquie said...

P.S. My husband has the most beautiful voice. He can sing opera, rock and roll... doesn't matter. Nothing I do is as glorious as the notes he utters. And he can't read a note. He learns by ear.