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"Happiness always looks small when you hold it in your hands, but let it go, and at once you learn how big and precious it is."
Maxim Gorky

Wednesday, May 8, 2013

To the Mainland!

I went for a visit to the Mainland to see my nieces on the weekend
and what a glorious weekend it was!
The trip over on the ferry, early morning was a true reminder of
why people flock here and why so many of us love living here...
 I was on one of the big ferries. Here is a smaller one going over to Saltspring Island...
Most of Saturday was taken up with Steph's baseball games, gardening and a bbq at the house.
Sunday I took the girls to Steveston, one of B.C's heritage sites.
This is an old fish canning village which dates back to 1871...
Each summer fishermen of Japanese, Chinese, First Nations and European decent would
gather here eventually creating the settlement which remains today...
If you're in the market for fish, then this is the place to come.
Buy it straight from the guy who caught it, right off the boat...
...salmon...
 snapper...
...flounder, pollack and skate... 
 ...even fresh sea urchins!
These are the big boats who fish way up north and around the Queen Charlotte Islands...
Although today was a bright and beautiful day, Steveston has a dark side of it's history.
On December 7, 1941, the Japanese attacked Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, with Canada declaring war on Japan soon thereafter. Responding to fears that people of Japanese decent in coastal communities like Steveston, would help Japan invade BC, the federal government arrested Japanese-Canadian community leaders and confiscated Japanese-owned fishing boats. In 1942, the federal government ordered the evacuation of all Japanese males over the age of 18, which was later expanded to include women and children. Many of these people were born in Canada.
 A total of 2,600 men, women and children of Japanese decent from Steveston were moved by train to the BC interior and interned during war. It wasn't until 1949—4 years after the end of hostilities—that a law was passed allowing them to return to the coast.
Alot of their possesions, including fishing boats were confiscated and sold off at auction.
Almost all Japanese Canadians never saw their things or the money again.
In a small corner of Steveston there is a garden dedicated to the Japanese...
Despite these atrocities, many people of Asian decent continue to live, work and play here today.
 To add to this gorgeous day, the kite flyers were out in full force...


So there you have it...a little bit of Canadian history.
 



 
 

 

3 comments:

acornmoon said...

Thanks for the tour and the history lesson. I love the snow topped mountains, such wild open country and how vast!

Mairéad said...

A very interesting and informative historical tour.
Great pics too. I really like the idea of buying freshly caught fish off a boat.

Cobalt Violet said...

Japanese interment camps here too. So sad.
By the way, my parents went on retirees cruise with old workmates and were in Victoria today and will be in Vancouver tomorrow and Sunday. We were coming through your blog and doing research! I don't know how much time they will have for sightseeing but I was getting very envious!!!